Report

Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Paper – Samsung Technical White paper

Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Paper – Samsung Technical White paper

Introduction

The 5G system supports a wide range of services such as enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC), and massive machine type communications (mMTC). Compared to its predecessor, 5G technology provides its users with enhanced experiences through faster data speeds, higher capacity, lower latency, and higher reliability. To arrive at such benefits without any disruption, service providers must find a seamless transition path from 4G long-term evolution (LTE) to 5G new radio (NR). However, newly released frequency bands for use in 5G deployments – such as the C-band (3-5 GHz) and millimeter wave (mmWave) band (24-40 GHz) – are higher than the current 4G frequency bands that sit below 3 GHz. This implies that while deploying 5G on the high frequencies with wider bandwidth may yield higher data rates, doing so will be inherently disadvantageous in terms of coverage due to the large amount of signal loss via propagation and penetration. A lower frequency spectrum, on the other hand, is favorable for 5G deployment, in that it provides a wide-area coverage. Therefore, for smooth transition, it is pivotal to deploy 5G in the lower frequency bands, which are mostly occupied by 4G frequencies

To this end, spectrum re-farming is the most logical and straightforward approach. As such, prior to 4G, spectrum re-farming was the conventional choice when transitioning from one communication generation to the next. Spectrum re-farming is done by draining all previous generation users from a frequency band and re-utilizing the same frequency band for next generation users. Re-farming is usually carried out at carrier levels, where a gradual reduction is made in the number of previous generation users, followed by a subsequent increase in the number of next generation users. For example, in Figure 1, in the second diagram from the left, a single LTE carrier is replaced with an NR spectrum to provide services to a few new NR users. As the number of NR users increases, more LTE carriers are replaced by NR carriers until the entirety of the frequency band is occupied by NR carriers and used for NR purposes

 

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Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Paper

https://gsacom.com

 

Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Paper – Samsung Technical White paper

Introduction

The 5G system supports a wide range of services such as enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC), and massive machine type communications (mMTC). Compared to its predecessor, 5G technology provides its users with enhanced experiences through faster data speeds, higher capacity, lower latency, and higher reliability. To arrive at such benefits without any disruption, service providers must find a seamless transition path from 4G long-term evolution (LTE) to 5G new radio (NR). However, newly released frequency bands for use in 5G deployments – such as the C-band (3-5 GHz) and millimeter wave (mmWave) band (24-40 GHz) – are higher than the current 4G frequency bands that sit below 3 GHz. This implies that while deploying 5G on the high frequencies with wider bandwidth may yield higher data rates, doing so will be inherently disadvantageous in terms of coverage due to the large amount of signal loss via propagation and penetration. A lower frequency spectrum, on the other hand, is favorable for 5G deployment, in that it provides a wide-area coverage. Therefore, for smooth transition, it is pivotal to deploy 5G in the lower frequency bands, which are mostly occupied by 4G frequencies

To this end, spectrum re-farming is the most logical and straightforward approach. As such, prior to 4G, spectrum re-farming was the conventional choice when transitioning from one communication generation to the next. Spectrum re-farming is done by draining all previous generation users from a frequency band and re-utilizing the same frequency band for next generation users. Re-farming is usually carried out at carrier levels, where a gradual reduction is made in the number of previous generation users, followed by a subsequent increase in the number of next generation users. For example, in Figure 1, in the second diagram from the left, a single LTE carrier is replaced with an NR spectrum to provide services to a few new NR users. As the number of NR users increases, more LTE carriers are replaced by NR carriers until the entirety of the frequency band is occupied by NR carriers and used for NR purposes

 

.

Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Paper

https://gsacom.com

 

Date: 8th Feb 2021
Type: Member Report
Technology: Spectrum
Originator: Samsung

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